Seeded rye bread

I was buying rye bread in a local shop, delicious for light summer lunches with cheese and salad. Now it isn’t available, and I was looking to make my own. This may need a tweak here and there to suit, but it works very well. 

INGREDIENTS: 

  • 500g rye flour
  • 2 tsp of dried yeast
  • 1 tbsp treacle or brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp sunflower oil
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 3 tbsp ‘8 seed mix‘ or ‘5 seed mix‘ from Seasoned Pioneers (or a mix of poppy seed, linseed, sunflower seeds, caraway, as you prefer)
  • 2 tbsp pumpkin seeds
  • 430ml water

METHOD:

  • In a large mixing bowl, mix the seeds, flour and salt. 
  • In a measuring jug, measure out the water, sugar and oil, and add the dried yeast. 
  • Once the yeast has mixed into the water, add it to the flour mixture a bit at a time, mixing together to a dough, ensuring that all the flour is incorporated. You don’t want the mixture to be sloppy. 
  • Top tip at this point – if you have some left-over white bread dough, you can kneed a bit of this in as well. 
  • Coat a work surface with a bit more sunflower oil and kneed for ten minutes or so. The dough won’t be as stretchy as a gluten-based loaf, but it will get smoother. 
  • Form the dough into a loaf shape. I use a loaf tin, but you could make a cob loaf as well. Put the formed loaf into a tin or a baking sheet, cover with a teatowel and leave to rise for up to eight hours. I don’t usually wait as long, I like a dense and heavy rye bread. 
  • Heat the oven to 220C, and bake the loaf for 30 minutes, until it sounds hollow when tapped. 

This works on the rye setting on my bread machine as well. 

Beetroot, caraway and goat’s cheese soda-bread

This is a delicious Ottolenghi recipe from SIMPLE. It is so rich and full of flavour, you don’t need to add anything much. It is great sliced and spread with butter, or with a thin slice of smoked salmon. I made it as part of a mega cooking session so that I had lots of food that was good with salad, as this certainly is. I had to adapt a bit to fit with locally available ingredients. 

INGREDIENTS:

  • 50g rolled oats
  • 2 tsp dried thyme leaves
  • 50g pumpkin seeds
  • 2 tsp caraway seeds
  • 2 tsp nigella seeds
  • 100g plain flour
  • 100g wholemeal flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 200g grated raw beetroot
  • 2 large eggs
  • 80ml sunflower oil
  • 80g soured cream
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 20g grated parmesan
  • 120g goat’s cheese
  • Salt

METHOD:

  • Preheat the oven to 180C fan. Grease and line a loaf tin. 
  • Mix the oats, thyme, pumpkin, caraway, and nigella seeds in a small bowl. 
  • In a medium bowl, mix the flours and the baking powder and baking soda, along with 1/2 tsp salt. Whisk together to aerate, then add the grated beetroot and all but one tbsp of the oat mixture
  • In another bowl, lightly whisk the eggs together and beat in the oil, soured cream, honey and parmesan. 
  • Mix the egg mixture into the dry ingredients, and fold in the crumbled goat’s cheese. 
  • Pour the mixture into the tin, and add the remaining oat mixture to the top. 
  • Bake for 40 minutes, then cover with foil and bake for another 40 minutes. 
  • Remove from the oven, and set to cool for around 5 minutes before removing from the tin and cooling on a rack. It needs to be cooled for at least 20 minutes before slicing. 

 

 

Peanut butter bread

This is part of the campaign to find recipes for all the stashed ingredients we have. Why, I wonder, do we have so many jars of peanut butter? I thought of making bread with it in the bread maker, and finally I think I have got the proportions right. This makes bread that is delicious with jam in particular, but is also good with salad, or with marmite.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 325ml cold water
  • 2 tsbp honey
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp peanut butter
  • 350g white bread flour
  • 125g wholemeal bread flour
  • 1 tsp yeast for bread machines

METHOD:

  • Put the ingredients in the bread machine in the order above
  • I used the white bread setting, middling sized loaf. Some bread machines prefer you to put the yeast in first, then the dry ingredients, and then the liquids.